Insurances We Accept

  • 1199
  • AARP
  • AETNA
  • AFFINITY
  • ALICARE
  • ANTHEM BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD
  • CIGNA
  • CROSSROADS
  • ELDERPLAN
  • EMBLEM
  • EMPIRE BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD
  • FIDELIS
  • GHI
  • GOLDEN RULE
  • GUARDIAN
  • HEALTH CARE PARTNERS
  • HEALTH FIRST
  • HEALTH NET
  • HEALTH PLUS
  • HIGHMARK BLUE SHIELD
  • HIP
  • HIP MEDICAID
  • HUMANA
  • MAGNACARE
  • METROPLUS
  • MEDICARE
  • MULTIPLAN
  • NEIGHBORHOOD
  • OXFORD
  • THE EMPIRE PLAN
  • TOUCHSTONE HEALTH
  • TRICARE
  • UMR
  • UNITED HEALTH CARE
  • UNITED HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY PLAN
  • VNSNY

Starting in 2014, the ACA, or Affordable Care Act, will give more Americans access to health insurance.

While premiums may be significantly lower for some Americans, one should expect a few changes with regards to cost in the form of co-insurance, deductibles, co-payments and prescription cost.

Below, we discuss how each of these responsiblities may affect you with regards to healthcare.

Feel free to click the button below to ask about your insurance - or any payment options.

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An insurance premium is the amount of money charged by a company for active coverage. The sum a person pays in premiums, also referred to as the rate, is determined by several factors, including age, health, and the area a person lives in. People pay these rates annually or in smaller payments over the course of the year, and the amount can change over time. When insurance premiums are not paid, the policy is typically considered void and companies will not honor claims against it.

Your share of the costs of a covered health care service, calculated as a percent (for example, 20%) of the allowed amount for the service. You pay coinsurance plus any deductibles you owe. For example, if the health insurance or plan’s allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and you’ve met your deductible, your coinsurance payment of 20% would be $20. The health insurance or plan pays the rest of the allowed amount.

The amount you owe for health care services your health insurance or plan covers before your health insurance or plan begins to pay. For example, if your deductible is $1,000, your plan won’t pay anything until you’ve met your $1,000 deductible for covered health care services subject to the deductible. The deductible may not apply to all services.

A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for a covered health care service, usually when you get the service. The amount can vary by the type of covered health care service.

Co-Payments are due on the date of service, for each visit.

A physician specialist focuses on a specific area of medicine or a group of patients to diagnose, manage, prevent or treat certain types of symptoms and conditions. A non-physician specialist is a provider who has more training in a specific area of health care.

With this being said, a specialists' cost typically carries higher than a standard physician.

Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs) are employer-funded group health plans from which employees are reimbursed tax-free for qualified medical expenses up to a fixed dollar amount per year. Unused amounts may be rolled over to be used in subsequent years. The employer funds and owns the account. Health Reimbursement Accounts are sometimes called Health Reimbursement Arrangements.

A medical savings account available to taxpayers who are enrolled in a High Deductible Health Plan. The funds contributed to the account aren't subject to federal income tax at the time of deposit.

Funds must be used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Unlike a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), funds roll over year to year if you don't spend them.

An arrangement you set up through your employer to pay for many of your out-of-pocket medical expenses with tax-free dollars. These expenses include insurance copayments and deductibles, and qualified prescription drugs, insulin and medical devices. You decide how much of your pre-tax wages you want taken out of your paycheck and put into an FSA. You don’t have to pay taxes on this money. Your employer’s plan sets a limit on the amount you can put into an FSA each year.

There is no carry-over of FSA funds. This means that FSA funds you don’t spend by the end of the plan year can’t be used for expenses in the next year. An exception is if your employer’s FSA plan permits you to use unused FSA funds for expenses incurred during a grace period of up to 2.5 months after the end of the FSA plan year.